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Now reading Miyeko’s Ozoni

Miyeko’s Ozoni

A New Years tradition.

For more more on New Year’s Mochi, see here.

Ingredients

Makes 5 servings
  • + BROTH
  • 10 pieces mochi, about 50 g each (Mochi comes fresh or dried in wrapped packages. Pieces range in size, but are typically around 50 g each.)
  • 1 C Dashi
  • + Hawaiian sea salt, to taste
  • 1 5"piece daikon, peeled and sliced into matchsticks
  • 1/2 C kuromame
  • 5-10 Simple Kombu Maki
  • 10 slices kamaboko
  • 1 bunch mizuna, washed, trimmed, and dried thoroughly, and chopped into 2" pieces

Broth

  • 1/2 chicken, broken down into thigh and breast
  • 1 1" piece ginger, peeled and quartered
  • 3 Simple Kombu Maki

Dashi

  • 1 18–24" piece kombu
  • 2 generous handfuls dried bonito flakes (katsuoboshi)

Kuromame

  • 200 g dried black soy beans, picked over
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 C granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 T soy sauce

Simple Kombu Maki

  • + boiled kombu sheet

Preparation

Make the Broth

Broth
  • 1/2 chicken, broken down into thigh and breast
  • 1 1" piece ginger, peeled and quartered
  • 3 Simple Kombu Maki
  1. The night before, bring about 3 quarts of water to boil in a large soup pot. Add the chicken and ginger, return the mixture to a boil, and simmer, loosely covered, for 1 hour.

  2. Skim the surface of the liquid. If the chicken is exposed above the water, add a little more to cover it.

  3. After an hour, add the kombu and simmer for another hour. Skim the surface of the liquid again. You’ll strain the stock in the morning, so there is no need to be too meticulous. Let cool, then hold in the refrigerator until ready to use.

Dashi

Dashi
  • 1 18–24" piece kombu
  • 2 generous handfuls dried bonito flakes (katsuoboshi)
  1. Place 3 cups cold water and kombu in a saucepan, bending the kombu so it fits. Bring the water to a near boil, then remove the kombu, reserving it on the side. Add the bonito flakes and simmer briskly for 10 minutes. Remove from heat.

  2. Let the liquid cool a little before straining the dashi over a container. Refrigerate if not using within a few hours.

Kuromame

Kuromame
  • 200 g dried black soy beans, picked over
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 C granulated sugar
  • 1-1/2 T soy sauce
  1. The night before cooking, place the dried beans in a heavy-bottomed pot (a Le Creuset is great, if you have one). Cover them with enough water so they are completely submerged, and soak for about 12 hours.

  2. The next morning, the beans will have swelled in size. Remove any beans that did not swell, or whose appearance looks shriveled. If the beans are not quite covered, add just enough water to cover them. Stir in the salt and sugar. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to reach a low simmer—the simmer should be really gentle, with only a few bubbles breaking the surface every couple of seconds. Simmer like this for about 1 hour, or until the beans give slightly when squeezed between your fingers.

  3. Gently stir in the soy sauce and continue to simmer for 1–2 more hours, or until the beans are tender when bitten, but still retain some firmness.

Simple Kombu Maki

Simple Kombu Maki
  • + boiled kombu sheet
  1. Lay the boiled kombu flat on a cutting board. Slice about half into rectangles about 2 inches by 2 inches. Slice the other half of the kombu into long, narrow ribbons, about 4 or 5 inches long and between 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch wide (the longer the strips, the easier tying will be, and you can always trim them).

  2. Roll one of the rectangles into a log shape and tie a ribbon piece around it with a knot, maintaining tension in the ribbon. Keeping this pressure, flip the bundle over and tie a knot again on this side, and then another knot, so you have a double knot.

  3. Repeat with the remaining pieces. Refrigerate if not using right away. These little kombu bows can be added to your ozoni with other vegetables to add even more umami; they are also often simmered in a soy-sauce-and-sugar liquid.

Make the Soup

Ingredients
  • + BROTH
  • 10 pieces mochi, about 50 g each (Mochi comes fresh or dried in wrapped packages. Pieces range in size, but are typically around 50 g each.)
  • 1 C Dashi
  • + Hawaiian sea salt, to taste
  • 1 5"piece daikon, peeled and sliced into matchsticks
  • 1/2 C kuromame
  • 5-10 Simple Kombu Maki
  • 10 slices kamaboko
  • 1 bunch mizuna, washed, trimmed, and dried thoroughly, and chopped into 2" pieces
  1. Skim off any fat that has solidified on the surface of the chicken broth overnight. Remove the chicken from the pot and set aside. Pour the chicken broth through a fine-mesh strainer into another soup pot, catching the ginger and kombu as you go. The strained stock will be cloudy.

  2. Place the mochi pieces in a bowl, and cover with water.

  3. Separate the chicken meat into one bowl, removing any skin, gristle, veins, and bones into another bowl. The bones can be frozen for making more broth another day (as any good grandmother will tell you). Shred the chicken meat, and set it aside.

  4. Add the dashi to the strained chicken stock, and bring to a boil. Add the daikon, kombu maki, and kuromame. Simmer, partly covered, until the daikon is translucent, about 15 minutes.

  5. Remove the mochi from the water, and add it to the soup. Simmer until the mochi is soft all the way through, about 5 minutes.

  6. Serve each person two soft mochi and two ladles of the soup, with plenty of daikon and beans. Add the shredded chicken, two slices of kamaboko, chopped mizuna, and extra kuromame to taste.